Self Care Information - Excessive sweating

If you would like to view the Excessive Sweating Self Care information in a downloadable Word document, click here.

Excessive sweating is common and can affect the whole body or just certain areas. Sometimes it gets better with age but there are things you can do and treatments that can help. It’s normal to sweat if you get hot or do exercise, but you may be sweating excessively if you’re sweating when your body doesn’t need to cool down. Excessive sweating can happen for no obvious reason, because of another condition you may have or as a side effect of medication you’re taking.

Things you can do to help with excessive sweating:

Do…

  • wear loose-fitting clothes to minimize signs of sweating
  • wear socks that absorb moisture and change your socks at least twice a day if possible
  • wear leather shoes and try to wear different shoes day to day

Don’t…

  • wear tight clothes or man-made fabrics – for example, nylon
  • wear enclosed boots or sports shoes that may cause your feet to sweat more
  • do things that might make your sweating worse – for example, drinking alcohol or eating spicy food

How do I treat?

If you are still suffering from symptoms after trying to manage your symptoms using the tips above, you can also see a pharmacist about excessive sweating. There are things they can give you over the counter, such as:

  • stronger antiperspirants instead of deodorant
  • armpit or sweat shields to protect your clothing
  • foot powders for sweaty feet
  • soap substitutes that are more gentle on your skin.

When should I seek advice?

See a GP if you’re sweating excessively and:

  • things you can do yourself aren’t helping
  • it’s lasted for at least 6 months
  • it stops you from getting on with your daily activities
  • it happens at least once a week
  • it happens at night (you’re having night sweats)
  • you have a family history of excessive sweating
  • you’re taking medication for another condition

Your GP may refer you for tests if they think another condition may be causing your sweating.